Results for Recipes

But try it this way – cooked in cream and sherry – wow.  As a starter or a main course.  So popular it flies out of the kitchen.  Such a simple dish but beautiful.  Yum, yum.

Categories : Recipes

A quick dip in a pan of spluttering butter, held down on a blistering griddle or a quiet bake in the oven is all it needs.  Fish hates fuss.  I cannot see the point of turning a fillet into a mousse in order to stuff another fillet.  I can see even less why that fillet will appear in a sauce made from crushed crayfish and cream.  I am not even sure that fish should ever appear in haute cuisine to be pummelled and poached, prettied and primped and served with a puff pastry crescent.  I would rather fry fish in a bit of butter and eat it wish a squeeze of lemon and a lump of my home baked bread.  Fish tantalises with ginger and lime and soothes with tarragon and cream.  It satisfies without filling and digests without notice.  For me it is the perfect food.  Shellfish, by which I mean mussels, oysters, crabs and like is the very essence of the sea.  All of which are fished off the North Norfolk coast and delivered straight to our restaurant.  Lobsters as well, even better!!    Local mussels have just come back into season and are the best in the world.  So, so wonderful is a dish of moules mariniere with our home baked bread.  The best food ever followed by a beautiful local lobster just grilled with garlic and tarragon butter.  Half term is upon us soon and Norfolk is full of beautiful autumn colours with lovely weather, crisp mornings and sunny days.  Come and stay and experience the full enjoyment of the Norfolk countryside and beautiful local seafood.

Categories : Recipes

If there is an R in the month then our beautiful local mussels are on offer, the rest of the year we offer New Zealand green lipped mussels, they are still tasty but not as good as local Morston mussels, they are completely different.  Morston mussels are plump and juicy and New Zealand mussels are flatter and not so moist.  The original ten minute supper.  A pot of blue-black mussels steams in seconds with a glass of wine and a handful of aromatics – by which we mean parsley, peppercorns and a bayleaf.  The bay will do nothing in terms of flavour, but it does look the part.  You can be too practical.  Covered with a tight lid and cooked until the shells are open, three minutes or less, there will be supper in no time at all.  Pull the little wobbly orange mussels apart with your fingers and dunk your bread in the broth.  And the steam, fishy and salty, will smell wonderful.  Alternatively when the mussels are not in season steam New Zealand mussels in garlic and tarragon butter, absolutely gorgeous.  COME TO THE OLD FORGE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT AND HAVE THEM HERE WITH OUR OWN HOME BAKED BREAD.

Categories : Recipes

Skate with black butter is one of our specials and one of our favourites with our customers.  Skate is in season from September to April.  The only parts eaten are the wings which are sold whole from young skate or sliced from larger fish.

2lb skate, 2oz butter, 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar, court bouillon, 2 teaspoons capers, 2 teaspoons chopped parsley, salt and freshly ground back pepper.

Simmer the skate in the court bouillon for 15-20 minutes or until tender.  Remove from pan, drain and dry on kitchen paper.  Set aside and keep warm on a serving dish.  Heat butter in pan until it turns a rich brown colour.  Stir in the vinegar and capers and boil for 2-3 minutes to reduce slightly.  Pour over the fish, sprinkle with the parsley and serve immediately.  Serves 4.  Yum Yum!

For court bouillon, simmer a carrot, an onion, a clove, a bouquet garni, 8 peppercorns and a pinch of salt in 2 pints of water and 2 tablespoons vinegar for 15-20 minutes.  Strain.

Categories : Recipes

Opening Oysters – Wrap one hand in a tea towel and place the oyster in it, put your hand on a work top, push the point of an oyster knife or small, thick-bladed knife into the hinge of the oyster and, using firm but not excessive pressure, work the knife backwards and forwards into the shell, breaking the hinge.  As the hinge breaks, twist the point of the knife to lever the shell up then slide the knife under the top shell to sever the ligament that joins the oyster to the shell.  The ligament is slightly off to the right of centre of the oyster.  Lift off the top shell keeping the bottom shell upright at all times to avoid losing any of the juice.  Pick out any little pieces of shell that might have broken off.  ALTERNATIVELY, COME TO THE OLD FORGE AND WE WILL DO IT ALL FOR YOU!!

Categories : Recipes

Our photo shoot for promotion purposes has just been completed.  The documentary should be out in November and Colin and I will be pictured in most of the TV mags.  Don’t forget to watch the documentary, it is called “The Tripadvisors” a Cutting Edge documentary on Channel 4. 

Our special at the moment is scallops cooked in cream and sherry absolutely delicious as a main course. 

Thursford show is getting nearer so don’t forget to come and eat early with us before the show, we start at 4.30p.m.  Just phone and book.  Also we have some rooms left but not many!!

Categories : News, Recipes, Local events

For 4-6 people  a large piece of salmon on the bone, just over 1kg in weight, salt.  Come high summer, there is little more useful than a piece of cooked salmon in the fridge.  You can hack off a lump for lunch, or slide an elegant wedge off the bone for supper.  You can serve it with a dithering dollop of mayonnaise or a variation of perhaps with chopped green things in it, watercrass or the like.  The best method for cooking a large piece of salmon without drying it out is the simplest.  It has been used for some time, it works and it is effortless.  Wash the salmon and check that the fishmonger has removed all the scales and the blood inside.  He probably won’t have.  Even though you told him to.  Put the fish into a large deep pan.  We use a roasting tin because it is quite deep.  Pour enough water over the fish to cover it.  Use a measuring jug so you know how much you have used.  Add salt to the ratio of 50g of salt per litre of water.  It should taste stronger than seawater but slightly less salty than an emetic.  Bring the fish slowly to the boil.  It will take a while, then watch it carefully.  There should be little more than a bubble or two before you turn off the heat.  Clap on the lid, one that fits tight.  Leave overnight to cool.  The result will be a moist, but not wet, fish.  Lift out of the water, which you might as well throw away as it is too salty for stock, and carefully peel the skin off the fish.  All you need now is some sauce to go with it.  How about some quivering mayonnaise as glossy as a tart on a Saturday night?

Categories : Recipes

5 handfuls of fresh white breadcrumbs.  400g crabmeat.  Half a teaspoon of cayenne pepper.  3 tablespoons of grain mustard.  A tablespoon of Worcestershire sauce.  3 spring onions, chopped.  4 heaped tablespoons mayonnaise.  5 tablespoons chopped parsley.  Juice of half a lemon. Oil.

Mix together all the ingredients except the oil and season with salt and pepper.  Leave in the fridge for at least twenty minutes.  With heavily floured hands, gently (and I mean gently) shape the mixture into nine round patties.  The less you handle them the easier the job will be.  As you shape each one, put it on a floured plate.  Heat a little groundnut oil in a frying pan – just enough to cover the bottom.  When it is hot, put the patties in (you will probably need to do this in two lots, adding new oil to the second batch).  Fry for two minutes on the first side, then turn and cook for three minutes longer.  Drain on kitchen paper and eat with halves of lemon for squeezing and a watercress or frisee salad.

Categories : Recipes

The most savoury of seafood.  The most juicy too.  Of course, crab is really a seaside treat to be eaten within a cockle’s throw of the pier, but a treat that can taste almost as good at home.  Just close your eyes and think of Cromer.  A freshly cooked crab can seem like the food of the gods, wrenched  limb from limb on the kitchen table for Saturday tea.  Chips of cream and orange shell all over the show.  Best fun for those with the time to dismantle a freshly cooked crab are the spindly, hairy legs – precious little meat but such sweet juice.  You may need to improvise with tools from kitchen, workbench and sewing kit.  Such a task should not be hurried.  You cannot hurry a crab tea.  And neither should you.  We do not suggest you dress a crab unless you have time to kill.  With nothing else to do it can be a fun thing – cracking, wrenching, smashing, picking, pulling and gouging.  Not to mention licking your fingers and sucking bits of shell.  But there is an alternative for the short of time – and we are not talking about those crab sticks, the long white digits that have never even seen the inside of a crab.  Fishmongers and many major supermarkets often sell neat dressed crab all ready to scoff.  It is not as dear a way to buy as you might think, especially if time is money to you.  Such a neat little package, everything done and, what is more, they often still include the crab’s toes to suck.    Dressed Cromer crab served with some mayonnaise and a slice of lemon to squeeze over with lovely crunchy french bread.  Absolutely wonderful.

Categories : Recipes

No food beckons in quite the same way as an oyster on its open shell.  Ridiculously sexy, salty, juicy, quivering things that they are.  Yet the oyster does not appeal to everyone, possibly because of its association with smart city restaurants where they are consumed out of bravado as much as for flavour.  Only the wasteful, the crusty and the frigid take them down in one gulp.  Suck, gulp, gone.  What a waste.  Chewing an oyster, even slightly, releases the salty, fishy tang.  And then it slides down.  Local Blakeney oysters are some of the best in the country, the oyster beds being off the coast at Blakeney.  An oyster is just as good to eat once cooked.  It is just different.  Those who get snooty about cooking oysters are missing some good food.  Dropped wet, wobbly and lightly floured into a pan of shallow, frothing butter, they are done in a minute.  Maybe less.  The alarm bell sounds when their edges start to curl.  They will be lightly crisp outside (eat them quickly before they soften), their insides all trembling, creamy flesh.  As seductive a mouthful as it is possible to imagine.

Categories : Recipes